OVERVIEW

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a degenerative, inflammatory, autoimmune disorder, whereby the immune system appears to attack the protective sheath (myelin) that covers the nerves in the brain and spinal cord, affecting communication between the brain and the rest of the body. Also with neurodegenerative diseases such as MS the brain is known to shrink, which some believe can be helped by addressing mitochondrial damage and dysfunction. What triggers the autoimmune reaction of MS is still unknown, it’s been theorized it could be a virus or bacteria in the myelin sheath, environmental factors such as vitamin D deficiency, or that it’s genetic predisposition.

Early signs and symptoms of MS vary widely but include; blurred vision, slurred speech, tingling or numbness in the arms and legs, clumsiness, or unsteady gait. The course of MS also varies greatly, with some experiencing a progressive worsening of symptoms, to the point where sight, speech and movement are greatly impaired, while others experience long periods of remission with no new symptoms developing. Various medications, diet and lifestyle changes can slow progression and help manage symptoms. If you have been diagnosed with MS, there are plenty of cases where the disease has responded very positively to specific multiple sclerosis nutrition and lifestyle changes. Below are some of the best foods to consume for MS.

Asparagus

Asparagus is high in Sulfur, which is highly important for proper mitochondrial functioning and is one of the key nutrients missing in those with MS. Sulfur is essential to neurotransmitter production and neuronal health as well as playing a key role in electron transfers during energy production in the mitochondria. It also plays a role in proper insulin functioning and is used by the liver and kidneys to remove toxins from the bloodstream. Dr. Terry Wahls, a leading authority on MS, recommends eating 3 cups of sulfur-rich vegetables per day.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Carrots

Brightly colored vegetables, like carrots, contain high levels of flavonoids, anthocyanins and beta-carotene. Evidence shows that these potent phytonutrients are beneficial in the prevention of degenerative diseases. Specifically with MS, they are thought to work by inhibiting neuroinflammation, activating synaptic signaling, and improving blood flow to the brain. It’s thought that some dietary anthocyanins can cross the blood-brain barrier, allowing them to have a direct beneficial effect. Dr. Terry Wahls, an authority on MS, recommends those healing from MS to eat 3 cups of brightly colored foods per day.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Beets

Brightly colored vegetables like beets contain high levels of flavonoids and anthocyanins. Evidence shows that these potent phytonutrients are beneficial in the prevention of many degenerative diseases. Specifically with MS, they are thought to work by inhibiting neuroinflammation, activating synaptic signaling, and improving blood flow to the brain. It’s thought that some dietary anthocyanins can cross the blood-brain barrier, allowing them to have a direct beneficial effect. Dr. Terry Wahls, leading authority on MS, recommends those healing from MS to eat 3 cups of brightly colored foods per day.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Blueberries

Brightly colored fruit, like blueberries, contain high levels of flavonoids and anthocyanins. Evidence shows that these potent phytonutrients are beneficial in the prevention of many degenerative diseases. Specifically with MS, they are thought to work by inhibiting neuroinflammation, activating synaptic signaling, and improving blood flow to the brain. It’s thought that some dietary anthocyanins can cross the blood-brain barrier, allowing them to have a direct beneficial effect. Dr. Terry Wahls, leading authority on MS, recommends those healing from MS to eat 3 cups of brightly colored foods per day.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Cabbage

Cabbage is particularly beneficial for those with MS because it has all the benefits of other dark leafy greens but is also high in Sulfur, necessary for proper mitochondrial function and is one of the key nutrients often missing in those with MS. Sulfur is essential for neurotransmitter production and neuronal health and plays a key role in the electron transfer chain (energy production in the mitochondria). It’s also needed by the liver and kidneys to aid detoxification. Dr. Terry Wahls, a widely known MS expert, recommends eating 3 cups of Sulfur-rich vegetables per day.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Herring

High-quality protein like Herring is essential for overall health and healing. Wild and organic meat are excellent sources of vitamins (most importantly for MS vitamins B and D) and minerals, as well as having high levels of omega-3 fatty acids. These fats are very important with MS due to their role in myelin production and mitochondrial support. These are also natural sources of creatine, which plays a major role in ATP production in the mitochondria, particularly important to high energy cells like neurons affected with MS. Herring is particularly high in CoQ10, creatine, vitamin D and omega 3s, four important nutrients recommended for those with MS!

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Liver

Organ meats such as liver are a very concentrated source of protein, minerals and vitamins, especially vitamin B12, which is required for the synthesis and maintenance of nerve cells and the myelin sheaths that protect them. Consuming liver from organic, grass-fed animal sources can help to protect against myelin damage in cases of MS.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are high in Sulfur, necessary for proper mitochondrial function and is one of the key nutrients often missing in those with MS. Sulfur is essential to neurotransmitter production and neuronal health as well as playing a key role in electron transfer chain (energy production in the mitochondria). It’s also needed by the liver and kidneys to aid detoxification. Dr. Terry Wahls, leading MS expert, recommends eating 3 cups of Sulfur-rich vegetables per day.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Cook + Cure - The Health App Tailored to You
Cook + Cure - The Health App Tailored to You

The health app tailored to you

Find more foods, remedies, recipes, and lifestyle practices recommended by experts to help with multiple sclerosis and much more. We’re all different. Find information tailored to your unique combination of health problems, goals + diet preferences.

Cook + Cure - The Health App Tailored to You

CoQ10

CoQ10, or ideally Ubiquinol, which is it’s more effective form, is highly beneficial for those with MS due to its unique role in energy production in the Mitochondria. It’s known that the mitochondria of those affected with neurodegenerative diseases such as MS are functioning below normal. The neurons affected in MS have a very high energy demand so taking a CoQ10 supplement can help increase energy production in these cells.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Creatine

Creatine is recommended for people with MS because it’s closely involved in energy (ATP) production in the mitochondria. The link between neurodegenerative diseases like MS and low functioning mitochondria has been observed in studies, and appear to respond well to supplementation with creatine.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Vitamin B Complex

The B-complex vitamins are essential if you are healing from MS because they play a role in maintaining nerve structure and function, including the myelin sheath. Vitamin B12 is particularly important as some studies have shown that people with MS often have low levels of vitamin B12, or have problems processing it efficiently. If you’re not eating enough foods rich in B-vitamins, consider supplementing with a high-quality B-complex vitamin and extra B12.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland

Vitamin D

Many studies indicate that vitamin D plays a crucial role in Multiple Sclerosis and as such, supplemental Vitamin D is recommend by most MS authorities. It’s known that populations living above a certain geographic latitude with less sun exposure, experience higher rates of MS per capita. One study showed that almost 50% of people diagnosed with a neurodegenerative disease, like MS, are vitamin D deficient.

Liz Gale Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale

Nutritional Therapist

Liz Gale Nutrition

Ireland